Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Idles - Wakefield, Unity Works. March 31st 2017 (LIVE REVIEW)



"...Don't be fooled by the wit and hijinks that pour freely from this band however, they have a hell of a lot to say about our current state of affairs and Talbot rightly so, is mad as hell..."



Idles frontman Joe Talbot is eyeballing the curiously-gathered onlookers inside the tiny top floor room of Wakefield's Unity Works. He and his band are on another toilet circuit of the UK, but this time things are a little different. There's a momentum surrounding Idles that is swiftly gathering pace and it's been a long time coming. The Bristol quintet's stunning debut album 'Brutalism' has finally landed into our lives and quite bluntly, it pisses all over, well, just about everything else currently. 'Brutalism' is honest, intense, fun, captivating, often ridiculous and necessary as hell right now. Everything that's getting your goat in these uncharted times we find ourselves in, is addressed in a manner even the furious Sleaford Mods must surely applaud.     

Barring the album's closing slower-paced track 'Slow Savage' and the sadly missing 'Rachel Khoo', their live set is pretty much the rest of Brutalism, with bells on. The infectiously catchy, pot-shot slinging of 'Well Done' stirs up a frenzy in the crowd and even a minor vocal false start on the punk-as-you-like 'Stendhal Syndrome' only intensifies the rest of the song. Lightning fast drums clatter with a heavy Future Of The Left-esque bass and razor-sharp guitars. Whether Talbot is purposefully entertaining himself as well as us is not in question. Carefree verbal swipes at bandmates and a tongue-lashing for the likes of Catfish And The Bottlemen abound. (Fair play).  Don't be fooled by the wit and hijinks that pour freely from this band however, they have a hell of a lot to say about our current state of affairs and Talbot rightly so, is mad as hell. Rather than just goofing around, their strong sense of playfulness and ability to not take things too seriously only masks an intensity of a band that are ready to take on the pretenders of this world. 


Tonight's parting shot is led by Talbot inviting the audience up on to the stage then vacating it to film the closing noise-fest meltdown from his phone. Bemused and awkward looking gents fumble to find some moves as screaming guitars are placed over unsuspecting necks and the whole charming calamity comes to a close.


An element of slight danger and unpredictability lurks in the shadows wherever Idles play as they sweep across this country of ours. 

There is hope Britain, and musically it lies within bands like this.

Words - Pete Jackson

Idles


Unity Works


Brutalism is available to buy now